Fauquier County Public Library

Library Updates

Remembering Fauquier’s Equestrian History

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The recent Virginia Gold Cup put us in mind of Fauquier County’s rich equestrian history.  Horses show up in numerous histories of Fauquier, but none more so than in the writings of M. Louise Evans.

Evans (1887-1966) moved from North Carolina to Warrenton, VA in 1904 and by the following year had secured a job with the Fauquier Democrat (now the Fauquier Times) where she wrote articles of local interest.  In 1915, she became the newspaper’s local editor and business manager.  She also eventually served as Warrenton’s correspondent to the Associated Press and worked for the Virginia Gold Cup Office. (more…)

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Kiddosphere: Summer Reading: New Books to Kick off the Summer

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YOU GUYS. We have so many amazing books coming our way that it’s unreal. With Memorial Day and summer vacation coming up, I hope you and yours have a reading-filled summer planned! If you’re looking for some outstanding titles to add to your to-be-read list, keep reading.

Children’s Books

Front Desk by Kelly Yang book cover

Front Desk has received fabulous reviews and a ton of buzz on Twitter, so I’m looking forward to reading this story about a young Chinese-American girl and her family’s hotel.

I loved Amina’s Voice, so I cannot wait to read her series opener, Power Forward, about fourth grader Zayd’s love for basketball (and his plan to be the first Pakistani-American in the NBA).

Sci-Fu U has been a hit at our branches ever since we received our copies; this graphic novel series combines 1980s hip hop, robot aliens and martial arts into a super-fun story.

This year’s Shark Week (30th anniversary!) begins July 22, so I know Science Comics: Sharks will be one of our hottest titles this summer! The Science Comics series has been one of my favorite additions to our children’s nonfiction collection; every one has been a top hit.

Two Dogs in a Trench Coat Go to School sounds so sweet; to find out exactly what is causing their beloved human Stewart’s anxiety, they decide to impersonate as a new student in order to investigate what’s bothering him at school.

Young Adult

I am up to my eyeballs in Young Adult (YA) fantasy featuring teen princesses/teen queens, but our YA fans can’t get enough of them! Ash Princess features a teen princess captive in her own palace after her country is invaded and her mother is murdered; it’s received very good reviews.

Bethany Hamilton’s latest inspirational book, Be Unstoppable and Unsinkable: Moments, Milestones, and Medals, should be a popular read with her fans. It’s a companion to her documentary, which should definitely spark interest.

Give Me Some Truth by Eric Gansworth book cover

Eric Gansworth’s If I Ever Get Out of Here is one of my favorite YA historical fiction novels, so Give Me Some Truth is definitely high on my TBR list. Although it also takes place on the Tuscarora reservation in the  decade after “If I Ever Get Out of Here”, this involves new characters who are also finding their way as Native teens in a community that has to face tensions with the surrounding Caucasian community in the area. Pop music was a major part of the first novel, and it appears to be the same with this one. Favorable reviews and lots of Twitter excitement precede this one; Gansworth is a much needed voice in YA fiction.

If you’re looking for an addicting and romantic YA fantasy, check out Caraval. Legendary is its sequel, also set in the strange audience-participation game show.

We received Royals right before the recent royal wedding, so it’s not surprising that our copies immediately checked out. With her older sister engaged to a crown prince, 16 year old Daisy finds her life uncomfortably in the public gaze. Of course, she meets the prince’s younger brother (who’s just a heap of trouble), which makes her life even more complicated!

Based on the hit Youtube series “Rooster’s Teeth,” RWBY features students at Beacon Academy training to save the world from ferocious monsters. I’m always ready for a new graphic novel series, so I have my eyes on this one!

Adults

The Cooking Gene: A Journey Through African American Culinary History in the Old South by Michael W. Twitty book cover

Anything food-history related grabs my attention, especially if it features a specific community or heritage. The Cooking Gene: A Journey Through African American Culinary History in the Old South recently won the prestigious James Beard award; I’ve followed Michael W. Twitty on Twitter for some time and am fascinated by his work, so can’t wait to dive into this one.

I have so many books checked out that I needed to finish due to other people waiting for them; as soon as I am done, I’m coming for The Cottingley Secret (provided it’s available). The faked fairy pictures scandal in 1917 is one of the most fascinating stories from 20th century history; we have the superb The Fairy Ring: Or, Elsie and Frances Fool the World that readers of this book should definitely check out, but there’s not been much on this geared toward adults (there was a beautiful movie made about it sometime in the early 2000s). I prefer my historical fiction to be purely historical fiction, and not time travel to the present; there are only a few that I really enjoy that do that, such as The Sandcastle Girls. However, this sounds just up my alley, so I’ll deal.

I guess historical fiction about old Hollywood is becoming more of a thing; although I was resistant to it for some unknown reason, Melanie Benjamin’s The Girls in the Picture has me more open to the idea (and it’s a break from wars, epic family struggles and the like). I’ll admit that I know little about Laurel and Hardy other than that they were a very successful comedy team in the 1930s and 1940s; He: A Novel intrigues me because we don’t often get historical fiction that features the friendship and working (sometimes fractious) relationship between two men (which is probably why it caught my eye; I loved “The Girls in the Picture” for the same thing, albeit it being between two women).

Since much of my reading about dinosaurs tends to be written for preschoolers-3rd graders, The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs might be a bit daunting for me, but I’m willing to give it a go. It’s received amazing reviews.

Although Civil War historical fiction doesn’t automatically interest me on the whole, it’s another story if you tell me it’s actually set in Virginia and covers the expanse of  100+ years (ending in the 1980s). A Shout in the Ruins sounds like a powerful read.

Need more ideas? Check out Wowbrary, which lets you know about books/DVDs/recorded books/ebooks that have been recently ordered (back issues are available).

Jennifer Schultz, Youth Services Librarian, Fauquier County Public Library

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America’s 100 Best-Loved Novels

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PBS recently announced The Great American Read List of America’s 100 Favorite Novels. The Great American Read is part of a new PBS series and multi-platform initiative that celebrates the joy of reading and books we love.

The list is the first step in The Great American Read’s quest to choose “America’s Best-Loved Novel” and, according to Paula Kerger, PBS President and CEO, is intended to “inspire a national conversation about beloved books and the power of reading.”

The List of America’s 100 Favorite Novels is limited to fiction books from anywhere in the world, as long as it was published in English. It contains books as far back as the 1600s, includes beloved world literature and contemporary best sellers and represents diverse categories from classics to sci-fi/fantasy.

Check out the list, organized by genre, with links directly to the Fauquier County Public Library’s catalog.  Then re-visit your favorites or explore others to add to your reading list!

Mystery/Horror

Romance

Classics

Sci-Fi/Fantasy

Adventure

Coming of Age

Young Adult

Contemporary

Literary

 

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PBS Launches The Great American Read

Posted by lisap on

PBS recently announced The Great American Read List of America’s 100 Favorite Novels. The Great American Read is part of a new PBS series and multi-platform initiative that celebrates the joy of reading and books we love.  The list was chosen through a national survey of 7,200 individuals.

Great American ReadThe list is the first step in The Great American Read’s quest to choose “America’s Best-Loved Novel” and, according to Paula Kerger, PBS President and CEO, is intended to “inspire a national conversation about beloved books and the power of reading.”

The List of America’s 100 Favorite Novels is limited to fiction books from anywhere in the world, as long as it was published in English. It contains books as far back as the 1600s, includes beloved world literature and contemporary best sellers and represents diverse categories from classics to sci-fi/fantasy.  Fauquier County Public Library’s collection includes almost every title that appears on the list, in diverse formats including print, book on CD, e-book and e-audio.

Voting for “America’s Best-Loved Novel” opened with the launch of the two-hour premiere episode on May 22 and will continue throughout the summer online, through social media, by phone and SMS texting. A series of documentaries with celebrities, authors, fans and everyday American’s about how particular books have influenced them and American culture will also air on PBS.

Join the Great American Read at your library

In the wake of the first Fauquier Community Read, Fauquier County Public Library knows first-hand the deep connection the community has to reading. “Over 800 people checked out “Thunder Dog” by Michael Hingson during the 2018 Fauquier Community Read and hundreds more attended events that were part of the program. That is a clear testament to the importance and love of reading in our community,” noted Maria Del Rosso.

There are several ways you can join in the Great American Read at your local library:

  • Pick up a copy of America’s 100 Favorite Novels list at your local library or check out the list, arranged by genre, with convenient links directly to the library’s catalog.
  • Browse our Great American Read display. Beginning June 1 a different genre from the list will be on display.
  • Read any book on the America’s 100 Favorite Novels list and use it to cross off a square on your Library Bingo card (part of the adult summer reading program beginning June 1).
  • Visit our Facebook page and post the title of your favorite book from the America’s 100 Favorite Novels list, using #GreatReadFCPL.
  • Watch for details about other ways to join the Great American Read at your local library coming later this summer.
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Reading Riot: Books that Feature Muslim Teen Characters

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This year Ramadan, which is observed by Muslims worldwide, began May 16 and ends June 14. Here we highlight some outstanding young adult books that focus on Muslim teens and the unique challenges they face.

Love, Hate & other Filters cover girl photographerLove, Hate & Other Filters is an unforgettable debut about a Muslim teen who copes with Islamophobia, cultural divides and a reality she can’t explain or escape. American-born Maya Aziz is torn between her parent’s world of college and marrying a suitable Muslim boy and her dream world of film school and dating her classmate, Phil. But then a terrorist attack changes her life forever. (more…)

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Kiddosphere: Recent Reads

Posted by jennifers on

Hard to believe it’s already May! This year has already brought some superb reads; here are some of my favorites:

Terry Lynn Johnson’s Survivor Diaries is one of my favorite new series, especially for picky/reluctant readers. Combining short chapters with lots of action, this series captures the attention of a great variety of reading abilities and interests (with survival tips at the end of each book from noted experts such as the National Forest Service and the Coast Guard!). (more…)

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This Week In Literature: Citizen Kane

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DVD Cover of Citizen KaneThis week in literature

“I don’t think any word can explain a man’s life.”
― Orson WellesCitizen Kane

Citizen Kane premiered May 1, 1941 in New York’s Palace Theater. Orson Welles was the producer, co-screenwriter, director and star.  It was his first feature film.

“Citizen Kane” is the semi-biographical story of the life and legacy of Charles Foster Kane, based on newspaper mogul William Randolph Hearst, tycoons Samuel Insull and Harold McCormick and parts of Welles’s own life. The story is told through the eyes of a reporter seeking to solve the mystery of the newspaper magnate’s dying word, “Rosebud.”

Although it achieve critical success – including nine Academy Award nominations, and was recognized by both the British Film Institute, American Film Institute, National Film Preservation Board and is considered one of greatest films of all times – it did not do well at the box office.

“Citizen Kane” has endured for over 75 years. How much do you know about this film classic?

Orson Welles was just 25 years old when he directed, co-wrote, starred in and produced Citizen Kane.

Citizen Kane was the feature film debut of Ray Collins, Joseph Cotten, Agnes Moorehead and Everett Sloane — and Welles himself.

Although nominated for nine Academy Awards®, Citizen Kane only won Best Screenplay.

The 1942 Best Picture Oscar went to John Ford’s How Green Was Your Valley, not Citizen Kane. Coincidentally, Welles modeled shots in Citizen Kane after some of Ford’s work.

In the opening scene, a dying Kane whispers the pivotal line “Rosebud.” “Rosebud” ranks #17 on American Film Institute’s 100 top film quotes of all time.

In 1975, 34 years after the release of Citizen Kane, Welles was honored with the third American Film Institute Lifetime Achievement Award. He was the first actor/director to receive the award.

Citizen Kane is part of the library’s extensive DVD collection, which includes film classics, titles from the Criterion Collection, National Film Registry, the American Film Institute (AFI), Academy Award winners, as well as a large selection of popular PBS shows such as Doc MartinDownton Abbey, documentaries, and biographical films from the American Masters series.  A large selection of DVD mysteries, with an emphasis on book-based series, can be found at the Warrenton central library. Stop by and browse, explore the collection online at or speak to a reference librarian.

 

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Reading Riot: Paranormal Genre Still Going Strong

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Creepy stories about the supernatural never go out of style. Do you like to read about ghosts, magic and things that go bump in the night? How about stories that make your heart pound? Today (May 3) is National Paranormal Day so go ahead and revel in all things supernatural. Whether you believe in supernatural phenomena or not, it’s fun to read about it! And the young adult collection is full of this popular genre. Read on for our recent recommendations. (more…)

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What We’re Reading in May

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The Fauquier County Public Library will discuss the following books in May. Visit our Reading Page for more information on our adult book programs. Book clubs are a great way to share your love of reading! Please join us; new members are always welcome!Stack of books (more…)

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